2016 100 german datings

11-Sep-2020 16:41

Some versions of it give astrological information about the birth of Rāma: The Moon and Jupiter were rising in Cancer, and five planets were in their exaltations or domiciles.

However, this information does not belong to the original epic.

Most of these passages tell us that the solstices are at the beginning of Capricorn and Cancer and the equinoxes at the beginning of Aries and Libra.

If it is assumed that ancient Indian astrology used a sidereal zodiac, then these statements can be dated astronomically because of the precession of the equinox.

Also revealing are the details of the astrological “birth chart” of Kṛṣṇa that are found in the Harivaṃśa and in some Purāṇa texts.

Tradition interprets the texts in such a way, that Kṛṣṇa was born in the month of Śrāvaṇa during the rainy season at midnight in the eighth night after full moon, so was born during the waning half-moon with the moon in the lunar mansion of Rohiṇī (in sidereal Taurus).

It only appears in versions of the northern recension, and the critical edition of the epic only quotes it in the critical apparatus.

Passages in the Purāṇas that mention zodiac signs also have to be dated to the Hellenistic epoch.

Hence it is not that I attack the Vedic religion itself, even less so as I myself am a follower of a Vedic doctrine, namely the Bhagavadgītā, or the Vedānta teachings of Kṛṣṇa.As a result, the original version of the present essay has led to very violent and emotional reactions on the part of Indian astrologers.My considerations wereinterpreted by them as an aggressive act, not only against Indian astrology, but even against the Vedic religion and Indian culture.In reality, however, my original intention was to critically examine the assertions that "Vedic" astrologers make in the west when propagating their allegedly superior methods.That I put traditional Indian doctrines in question was indeed inevitable, but not my motive.

Hence it is not that I attack the Vedic religion itself, even less so as I myself am a follower of a Vedic doctrine, namely the Bhagavadgītā, or the Vedānta teachings of Kṛṣṇa.As a result, the original version of the present essay has led to very violent and emotional reactions on the part of Indian astrologers.My considerations wereinterpreted by them as an aggressive act, not only against Indian astrology, but even against the Vedic religion and Indian culture.In reality, however, my original intention was to critically examine the assertions that "Vedic" astrologers make in the west when propagating their allegedly superior methods.That I put traditional Indian doctrines in question was indeed inevitable, but not my motive.While Indian astrology may be “Vedic” in that it is part of today's Vedic tradition, it is in fact a lot younger than the Vedas and has many elements which were not developed in India but in Mesopotamia, Egypt, and Greece.