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Constantine's profession of Christianity was not an unmixed blessing to the church.

in the lower rank of princeps initially, although he later claimed the rank of Augustus.

Constantine and Maxentius, although they were brothers-in-law, did not trust each other.

Upon coming to power Constantine unilaterally ended all persecution in his territories, even providing for restitution. Der spätantike Bilderschmuck des Konstantinsbogen .

His personal devotions, however, he offered first to Mars and then increasingly to Apollo, reverenced as Sol Invictus.

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6 Constantine henceforth observed this day as his dies imperii. "The Celestial Sign on Constantine's Shields at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge." Journal of the Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association 2 (1981) 15-28.

Having settled affairs in Britain swiftly, he returned to the Continent, where the city of Augusta Treverorum (Trier) served as his principal residence for the next six years.

12 Twenty-five years later Eusebius gives us a far different, more elaborate, and less convincing account in his Life of Constantine.

13 When Constantine and his army were on their march toward Rome - neither the time nor the location is specified - they observed in broad daylight a strange phenomenon in the sky: a cross of light and the words "by this sign you will be victor" (hoc signo victor eris or ).

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3 On this occasion he was required to put aside Helena and to marry Theodora, the daughter of Maximian. The soldiers at once proclaimed him Augustus; 6 Constantine henceforth observed this day as his dies imperii. "The Celestial Sign on Constantine's Shields at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge." Journal of the Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association 2 (1981) 15-28. Having settled affairs in Britain swiftly, he returned to the Continent, where the city of Augusta Treverorum (Trier) served as his principal residence for the next six years. 12 Twenty-five years later Eusebius gives us a far different, more elaborate, and less convincing account in his Life of Constantine. 13 When Constantine and his army were on their march toward Rome - neither the time nor the location is specified - they observed in broad daylight a strange phenomenon in the sky: a cross of light and the words "by this sign you will be victor" (hoc signo victor eris or ).

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6 Constantine henceforth observed this day as his dies imperii. "The Celestial Sign on Constantine's Shields at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge." Journal of the Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association 2 (1981) 15-28.

Having settled affairs in Britain swiftly, he returned to the Continent, where the city of Augusta Treverorum (Trier) served as his principal residence for the next six years.

12 Twenty-five years later Eusebius gives us a far different, more elaborate, and less convincing account in his Life of Constantine.

13 When Constantine and his army were on their march toward Rome - neither the time nor the location is specified - they observed in broad daylight a strange phenomenon in the sky: a cross of light and the words "by this sign you will be victor" (hoc signo victor eris or ).

Several months later Licinius issued an edict which is commonly but erroneously known as the Edict of Milan. "Die Kämpfe um die Nachfolge nach dem Tode Constantins des Großen." Byzantinische Forschungen 6 (1979) 101-50. "Die Berufung des Constantius Chlorus und des Galerius zu Caesaren." Chiron 4 (1976) 567-76. Corpus Basilicarum Christianarum Romae: The Early Basilicas of Rome.

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3 On this occasion he was required to put aside Helena and to marry Theodora, the daughter of Maximian. The soldiers at once proclaimed him Augustus; 6 Constantine henceforth observed this day as his dies imperii. "The Celestial Sign on Constantine's Shields at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge." Journal of the Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association 2 (1981) 15-28. Having settled affairs in Britain swiftly, he returned to the Continent, where the city of Augusta Treverorum (Trier) served as his principal residence for the next six years. 12 Twenty-five years later Eusebius gives us a far different, more elaborate, and less convincing account in his Life of Constantine. 13 When Constantine and his army were on their march toward Rome - neither the time nor the location is specified - they observed in broad daylight a strange phenomenon in the sky: a cross of light and the words "by this sign you will be victor" (hoc signo victor eris or ). Several months later Licinius issued an edict which is commonly but erroneously known as the Edict of Milan. "Die Kämpfe um die Nachfolge nach dem Tode Constantins des Großen." Byzantinische Forschungen 6 (1979) 101-50. "Die Berufung des Constantius Chlorus und des Galerius zu Caesaren." Chiron 4 (1976) 567-76. Corpus Basilicarum Christianarum Romae: The Early Basilicas of Rome.

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