Ault cam to cam no sighn up

20-Dec-2020 18:26

When he’s not at that spot, things begin to breakdown.And there’s not a tackle in the league who will look good when his quarterback is dropping 10 yards deep like Kaepernick did on this play.Many have brought up how frequently Kaepernick has been pressured this season, and it’s been a lot.According to Pro Football Focus, Kaepernick has been pressured on 39.6 percent of his drop backs, which is the sixth-highest rate among qualifying quarterbacks.Pull up any number of drop backs in which Cam is under pressure and you’ll see a quarterback who is comfortable sitting in the pocket until the last possible moment while delivering accurate passes without a ton of room to operate.Newton’s ability to work within the pocket makes an underwhelming offensive line look much better than it really is, but the bigger hurdle for him to overcome is the receiving corps he’s throwing to.Newton, on the other hand, is garnering MVP hype on the undefeated Panthers.

Newton is sacked on just 15.1 percent of his pressured drop backs, however, which puts him at just about league average (16th) and well below Kaepernick’s mark. Newton is completely unfazed when pressure is coming and bodies are closing in on him, something you can see on this play against the Jaguars: Cam’s willingness to sit squarely in the middle of the pocket allows Remmer to do what Staley should’ve been able to do on the play above, which is run the edge rusher (Chris Clemons) past the quarterback and out of harm’s way.

The examples are numerous, but this play versus the Packers in Week 4 has stuck with me: Joe Staley gets charged with the sack, but the fault lies with his quarterback.

Rather than stepping up in the pocket once he hits the last step of his drop and finding a wide open Garrett Celek in the back of the end zone, Kaepernick drifts backward.

This makes Staley’s job immensely more difficult, as Packers edge defender Nick Perry is left with a more advantageous path to the quarterback.

Protections are built around the quarterback being in a particular spot.

Newton is sacked on just 15.1 percent of his pressured drop backs, however, which puts him at just about league average (16th) and well below Kaepernick’s mark. Newton is completely unfazed when pressure is coming and bodies are closing in on him, something you can see on this play against the Jaguars: Cam’s willingness to sit squarely in the middle of the pocket allows Remmer to do what Staley should’ve been able to do on the play above, which is run the edge rusher (Chris Clemons) past the quarterback and out of harm’s way.The examples are numerous, but this play versus the Packers in Week 4 has stuck with me: Joe Staley gets charged with the sack, but the fault lies with his quarterback.Rather than stepping up in the pocket once he hits the last step of his drop and finding a wide open Garrett Celek in the back of the end zone, Kaepernick drifts backward.This makes Staley’s job immensely more difficult, as Packers edge defender Nick Perry is left with a more advantageous path to the quarterback.Protections are built around the quarterback being in a particular spot.One quarterback is carrying his offense on his back while the other is at the crux of his offense’s problems.