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29-Dec-2020 05:17

The dashed lines would represent how much of the page would be in focus in front and behind your subject when you snapped your photo.

Using a wider (lower) aperture, like f/2.8, will give you a nice background blur.

With a Date stamp feature which can be activated at one click, you can now recall memories at a glance, by looking at the date and time printed on each photo.

Sharing of photos is now made easier with the built-in Wi-Fi/ NFC feature.

to use it, but it offers a lot of capabilities that would otherwise clutter up the main editing application, and its powerful search, auto curation, and sharing tools can be very useful, in addition to the standard organization tools.

The last method for manipulating depth of field is to simply change your distance from subject.

Look at the difference between these next two photographs—in both of them I used the same focal length (50mm) and the same aperture (f/2.8). Notice how the background begins to blur as you look farther away from the numbers. to recap: When you want to create a softer, blurrier background in your photos, use a wider (lower) aperture value, switch to a longer lens, and get in close to your subject.

Out of those four photos, the picture with the best background blur is the first picture with the lowest aperture, taken at f/2.8.

Aperture is not the only thing to keep in mind when setting up your shot, but I would say that it In these next two photos I used the same aperture of f/5—I only changed the focal length of the lens. In the second photograph I used a 200mm lens length.

to use it, but it offers a lot of capabilities that would otherwise clutter up the main editing application, and its powerful search, auto curation, and sharing tools can be very useful, in addition to the standard organization tools.The last method for manipulating depth of field is to simply change your distance from subject.Look at the difference between these next two photographs—in both of them I used the same focal length (50mm) and the same aperture (f/2.8). Notice how the background begins to blur as you look farther away from the numbers. to recap: When you want to create a softer, blurrier background in your photos, use a wider (lower) aperture value, switch to a longer lens, and get in close to your subject.Out of those four photos, the picture with the best background blur is the first picture with the lowest aperture, taken at f/2.8.Aperture is not the only thing to keep in mind when setting up your shot, but I would say that it In these next two photos I used the same aperture of f/5—I only changed the focal length of the lens. In the second photograph I used a 200mm lens length.Smaller (higher) apertures, like f/16, will keep more of the shot in focus.