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22-Jan-2021 07:06

It had been luxurious, a place that one pre-Islamic poet described as filled with “the glow of fiery wine” and the aroma of roasting meat, with “statue-like” women who wore robes hemmed in gold.The site had gained importance with the rise of frankincense, the fragrant resin of a tree native to southern Arabia.“I was thinking this could go very bad.” It was an early step in an unlikely search for the long-lost trading post at Ubar, a mythic place that once teemed with wealth and lavish feasts.But it was also the start of something bigger: the revolution of a scientific field.

Their transport, a Vietnam War-era Huey helicopter, had returned to Thumrait Air Base to refuel, leaving them grounded until morning.For many modern archaeologists, remote sensing tools have become as valuable as carbon dating. Space archaeology developed over several decades, as it took a long time for Space Age tools to gain acceptance in one of the oldest scientific fields.“Can I please speak with someone who can help me find a lost city?In the ancient world, that resin was used to make incense for religious ceremonies and medical practices.From the time the city rose—roughly 2,000 years ago, according to estimates—until its fall between 300 and 500 CE, Ubar grew wealthy as an outpost of the frankincense trade. According to legends, the people of Ad (Ubar) behaved wickedly, provoking divine punishment.

Their transport, a Vietnam War-era Huey helicopter, had returned to Thumrait Air Base to refuel, leaving them grounded until morning.For many modern archaeologists, remote sensing tools have become as valuable as carbon dating. Space archaeology developed over several decades, as it took a long time for Space Age tools to gain acceptance in one of the oldest scientific fields.“Can I please speak with someone who can help me find a lost city?In the ancient world, that resin was used to make incense for religious ceremonies and medical practices.From the time the city rose—roughly 2,000 years ago, according to estimates—until its fall between 300 and 500 CE, Ubar grew wealthy as an outpost of the frankincense trade. According to legends, the people of Ad (Ubar) behaved wickedly, provoking divine punishment.For centuries, if archaeologists wanted to find an ancient or mythical site, they trudged through desert sands or rainforest thickets armed with little more than rumors and hand-drawn maps.