Consolidating benthal deposits

16-Feb-2021 21:27

Locally, wells in rocks of Early Permian or Early Cretaceous age may yield from about 10 to 100 gallons per minute.

The first letter after the section number denotes the quarter section or the 160-acre tract; the second, the quarter-quarter section or the 40-acre tract; and the third, the quarter-quarter-quarter section or the 10-acre tract. The topography grades southward from sand dunes along the Arkansas River to a loess-covered upland that is terminated on the south and southeast by deeply eroded valleys.In the eastern half of the area, the quality may be unsuitable locally as a result of upward leakage of highly mineralized water from underlying Permian rocks.A continuing program of monitoring changes in water levels and water quality is needed for assessing future problems and planning appropriate management.The principal source of water for all uses is from unconsolidated alluvial deposits that underlie most of the area.Therefore, it is important to evaluate the quantity and quality of water available, the effects of existing development, and the possible effects of future development.

The first letter after the section number denotes the quarter section or the 160-acre tract; the second, the quarter-quarter section or the 40-acre tract; and the third, the quarter-quarter-quarter section or the 10-acre tract. The topography grades southward from sand dunes along the Arkansas River to a loess-covered upland that is terminated on the south and southeast by deeply eroded valleys.

In the eastern half of the area, the quality may be unsuitable locally as a result of upward leakage of highly mineralized water from underlying Permian rocks.

A continuing program of monitoring changes in water levels and water quality is needed for assessing future problems and planning appropriate management.

The principal source of water for all uses is from unconsolidated alluvial deposits that underlie most of the area.

Therefore, it is important to evaluate the quantity and quality of water available, the effects of existing development, and the possible effects of future development.

All of Kiowa, Kingman, Pratt, and Stafford Counties, and parts of Barber, Barton, Edwards, Pawnee, Reno, and Rice Counties are included in the study.