Dating a girl with diabetes top secret dating tips

12-May-2020 08:53

Being older and having diabetes accelerate the development of diabetic complications such as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, and blindness.Elderly women with diabetes are at particularly high risk for coronary heart disease, visual problems, hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia, and depression.Most women with type 1 diabetes were diagnosed during childhood or adolescence.Women of minority racial and ethnic groups are two to four times more likely than non-Hispanic white women to have type 2 diabetes.There is an apparent increase in the number of youth of all racial and ethnic groups being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, and it appears to be more common among girls than boys.By age 20 years, 40%-60% of people with type 1 diabetes have evidence of retinopathy, or diabetic eye disease. The risk for developing proliferative retinopathy—the most severe form—is higher for girls than for boys (in at least one study).For women who do not currently have diabetes, pregnancy brings the risk of gestational diabetes.

Women with diabetes were more likely than women without diabetes to have a low socioeconomic status regardless of race, ethnicity, or living arrangements (marital status, size of household, and employment status).Women who have had gestational diabetes or have given birth to a baby weighting more than 9 pounds are at an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes later in life.The prevalence of diabetes is at least 2-4 times higher among African American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, and Asian/Pacific Islander women than among white women. Because of the increasing lifespan of women and the rapid growth of minority populations, the number of women in the United States at high risk for diabetes and its complications is increasing.Women with diabetes are also more likely to have a heart attack, and at a younger age, than women without diabetes.Diabetes is the fifth deadliest disease in the United States, and it has no cure.

Women with diabetes were more likely than women without diabetes to have a low socioeconomic status regardless of race, ethnicity, or living arrangements (marital status, size of household, and employment status).

Women who have had gestational diabetes or have given birth to a baby weighting more than 9 pounds are at an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes later in life.

The prevalence of diabetes is at least 2-4 times higher among African American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, and Asian/Pacific Islander women than among white women. Because of the increasing lifespan of women and the rapid growth of minority populations, the number of women in the United States at high risk for diabetes and its complications is increasing.

Women with diabetes are also more likely to have a heart attack, and at a younger age, than women without diabetes.

Diabetes is the fifth deadliest disease in the United States, and it has no cure.

Children whose mothers had diabetes during their pregnancies have a greater likelihood of becoming obese during childhood and adolescence and of developing type 2 diabetes later in life.