Dating for only 2 weeks aspxgridview1rowupdating

04-May-2020 19:09

This is normally less than 2.5mm and when seen increased (greater than 2.5mm, see image on the right) may indicate the baby has Down syndrome or may indicate another chromosomal abnormality. The nuchal translucency test will also check whether your baby has a visible nasal bone.

In the past few years it has been seen that approximately 3 in 4 babies with Down's syndrome do not have a visible nasal bone at the time of the first trimester screening test.

A scan maybe ordered when an abnormality is suspected on clinical grounds.

Otherwise a scan is generally booked in the first trimester to confirm pregnancy, exclude ectopic or molar pregnancies, confirm cardiac pulsation and measure the crown to rump length for dating.

Accuracy of CRL after 12 weeks in predicting gestational age diminishes and is replaced by measurement of the width of the fetal head (biparietal diameter or BPD).

The nuchal translucency (also spelled nucal translucency) is a collection of fluid beneath the fetal skin in the region of the fetal neck and this is present and seen in all fetuses in early pregnancy.

During the examination, the fetus is seen by abdominal ultrasound.

Occasionally the view is not clear and it may be necessary to perform a vaginal scan.

Currently the most accurate non invasive test for detecting Down syndrome during pregnancy is the measurement of the nuchal translucency with an ultrasound between 11 to 14 weeks of pregnancy.

Occasionally the nasal bone cannot be seen at 11 weeks as it is too early in the pregnancy.

If this is the case and this creates some concern then the scan can be repeated a week later.

The test cannot be performed outside this time frame as certain features that need to be seen on the scan are not present.

This test results in a 9095% detection rate of pregnancies that may be at an increased risk of carrying a genetical problem such as Downs Syndrome.

Currently the most accurate non invasive test for detecting Down syndrome during pregnancy is the measurement of the nuchal translucency with an ultrasound between 11 to 14 weeks of pregnancy.

Occasionally the nasal bone cannot be seen at 11 weeks as it is too early in the pregnancy.

If this is the case and this creates some concern then the scan can be repeated a week later.

The test cannot be performed outside this time frame as certain features that need to be seen on the scan are not present.

This test results in a 9095% detection rate of pregnancies that may be at an increased risk of carrying a genetical problem such as Downs Syndrome.

The baby will be measured, and the anatomy examined in detail.