Dating vintage pyrex

11-Aug-2020 05:55

A Nottingham-ware [brown stoneware] pot, with a lid, to hold a gallon or two, is very useful; especially if you have an oven: it does well to make a stew or soup, on which I shall give you a hint presently. (Comments don't appear instantly.) For sources please refer to the books page, and/or the excerpts quoted on the pages of this website, and note that many links lead to museum sites.(Esther Copley) You may like our new sister site Home Things Past where you'll find articles about antiques, vintage kitchen stuff, crafts, and other things to do with home life in the past. Feel free to ask if you're looking for a specific reference - feedback is always welcome anyway.You should have two strong iron pots, of different sizes; one or other of which, I hope, will be in frequent use.I would wish a working man to have a bit of something hot most days.

(See Ball Bros Glass Company, Anchor Hocking Glass Corporation, and Ball Perfect Mason).Tin Ware ...bread pans, large and small pattypans, cake pans, with a centre tube to ensure their baking well, pie dishes, (of block tin,) a covered butter kettle, covered kettles to hold berries, two saucepans, a large oil can, (with a cock,) a lamp filler, a lantern, broad bottomed candlesticks for the kitchen, a candle box, a funnel or tunnel, a reflector, for baking warm cakes, an oven or tin kitchen, an apple corer, an apple roaster, an egg boiler, two sugar scoops, and flour and meal scoop, a set of mugs, three dippers, a pint, quart, and a gallon measure, a set of scales and weights, three or four pails, painted on the outside, a slop bucket, with a tight cover, painted on the outside, a milk strainer, a gravy strainer, a colander, a dredging box, a pepperbox, a large and small grater, a box, in which to keep cheese, also a large one for cake, and a still larger one for bread, with tight covers.Wooden Ware ...a nest of tubs, a set of pails and bowls, a large and small sieve, a beetle for mashing potatoes, a spad or stick for stirring butter and sugar, a breadboard, for moulding bread and making pie crust, a coffee stick, a clothes stick, and mush stick, and meat beetle to pound tough meat, an eggbeater, a ladle for working butter, a bread trough, (for a large family,) flour buckets, with lids to hold sifted flour and Indian meal, salt boxes, sugar boxes, starch and indigo boxes, spice boxes...For anyone learning more about the different Kerr jar types and their market values, I would encourage them to consult the value pricing guide used by most advanced fruit jar collectors: the so-called “RED BOOK” of fruit jars.The Kerr glass plants were bought by Ball Corporation in 1992, (Ball later left the glass container business altogether, and sold the plants to Saint-Gobain Containers, now Verallia).

(See Ball Bros Glass Company, Anchor Hocking Glass Corporation, and Ball Perfect Mason).Tin Ware ...bread pans, large and small pattypans, cake pans, with a centre tube to ensure their baking well, pie dishes, (of block tin,) a covered butter kettle, covered kettles to hold berries, two saucepans, a large oil can, (with a cock,) a lamp filler, a lantern, broad bottomed candlesticks for the kitchen, a candle box, a funnel or tunnel, a reflector, for baking warm cakes, an oven or tin kitchen, an apple corer, an apple roaster, an egg boiler, two sugar scoops, and flour and meal scoop, a set of mugs, three dippers, a pint, quart, and a gallon measure, a set of scales and weights, three or four pails, painted on the outside, a slop bucket, with a tight cover, painted on the outside, a milk strainer, a gravy strainer, a colander, a dredging box, a pepperbox, a large and small grater, a box, in which to keep cheese, also a large one for cake, and a still larger one for bread, with tight covers.Wooden Ware ...a nest of tubs, a set of pails and bowls, a large and small sieve, a beetle for mashing potatoes, a spad or stick for stirring butter and sugar, a breadboard, for moulding bread and making pie crust, a coffee stick, a clothes stick, and mush stick, and meat beetle to pound tough meat, an eggbeater, a ladle for working butter, a bread trough, (for a large family,) flour buckets, with lids to hold sifted flour and Indian meal, salt boxes, sugar boxes, starch and indigo boxes, spice boxes...For anyone learning more about the different Kerr jar types and their market values, I would encourage them to consult the value pricing guide used by most advanced fruit jar collectors: the so-called “RED BOOK” of fruit jars.The Kerr glass plants were bought by Ball Corporation in 1992, (Ball later left the glass container business altogether, and sold the plants to Saint-Gobain Containers, now Verallia).It is not quite so fashionable, but that you have too much good sense to mind.