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1933 5 Colton Ginning and rrcavng iacloiiet t Sau* mhtra Amendment) Art 1936 MINES Central 1 The Mines Act. 1959 Stain I The Andhra Pradesh Shops and Establishments Act 19t4i» Amended in 19 States I The Bengal Mining Seillement Act 1912 PLANTATIONS Central 1 The Tea Districts Emigrant Labour (Repeal) Act.

1970 2 The Plantation* Labour Art 1951 Amended m 1933 and I960 8 The Kerala Shops and Commercial Establish mem* Art 1960 i 9 The Madhya Pradesh Shops and Commercial Eslabtishmc Dls Art 1338 Amended in 1967 10 The Madras Shops and Establishments Art 1947 (Also applies to Andhra Pradesh with certain modifications) 1 1 The Madras Catering Establishments Act 1958 Amended in 1961 12 The Mysore Shop* and Establishments Act, Stale* 1 The lalpaiguri Labour Art, 1931 TRANSPORT Central The Indian Railways Act 1890 Amended i I! 13 The Orissa Shop* and Commercial Establish- ments Act, 1956 Amended m 1958 14 The Punjab Shops and Commercial Establish- ments An, 1953 15 The Rajasthan Shop* and Commercial Establish- ments An 1958 16 The Saurashtra Shops and Establishments Act, (SNot in force m Maharashtra •The Act has been brought into force w,th effect from 15th June 1967 ••Schedule H to the Act was amended during 19$ THE INDIAN UVBOtnm AR BOOK, 1972 17 IS 19 The Ul Ur Pradesh Dookan Aur Vanj D'a Adhi slban Adhiiuyam, 1962.

1969 About 94 per cent of regular male Asian employees m Public Sector and about 87 per cent m prisate industry and commerce were earning K £720 and over annually dunng 1969, Working hours were regulated by Statute m certain indostncs and through wage council sys- tem and by colicctisc agreements between em- ployers and labour organisations The normal hours of work in industry and distributise trades were between 4S and 60 spread oser 6 working days p*f week with cfl*ct from Ist May.

1968 Under Rules the employers arc liable to provide his employees with proper medicines during ill- ness and also medical jltindancc if procurable, during $crtou illness Th- population of Laos was estimat'd at ebout J200 lakhs at the end of D.cember.

1923 Amended in 1924, 1925, 1929, 1933, 1937 (Tsv Ke), 1938, 1933. en J 4 The In Jitiiul D'r Rfet i Ririinp Comc*jme») Devivion Avi Amv-r Jr J m M'? rvi m •(h— I D L B Siisla*‘'4 PROTrcr Ti ON or children Central I The CTji JJrea i TIe O^wf of La N’ur) A^,f 1933 1 The Cmp’oiment of Children Act 193' Amen- ded in 19'9. The Employment Exchanges (Compulsory Noti* fieatjon of Vacancies) Act 1959 3 The Collection of Statistics Act, 1953 4 The C P W O Contractors Labour Regula- tions, 1946 5 The Apprentices Act, 1961 Amended lo 1972 6 The Seedi and Cigar Workers (Coodiuoos of Employment) Ace, 1966 7 The Co Dtraei Labour (Regulauon and Abob tion) Act, 1970 B The Central Labour Laws (Extension to lammn and Kashmir) Act, 1970 States 1 The Bombay Tenancy and Agricultural Lands Act, 1948 2 Tl« C P & Berar Regulation of Manufacture of Bidis (Agricultural Purposes) Act, 1943 3 The Hyderabad Public Contractofs’ Labour Re- gulations and Fair Wage Clauses.

1942, 1946, 1948, 19 2 The Employers’ Liabibty Act, 1938 Amended in 19 3 The War Injuries Ordinance, 1941 Amended in 1950 4 The War Injuries (Compensaboa Insurance) Act, 1943 Amended m 1950 5 The Employees’ State Insurance Act 1948 Amended m 19 6 The Coal Mines Provident Fund Family Pen* Sion and Bonus Schemes Act 1948 Amended in 1950 1951, 19 7 The Employees Provident Funds and Family Pension Fund Act 1932 Amended in 1953, 1956, 1953, 1960 1962, 1963 19 ^ 8 The Maternity Benefit Act 1961 Amended in 1972. »n J t')*' J The tij »’Tul Di^piitct (Hin Vme an J Intunw (.o-ijvt-'''* Act l'*44 Ame Rs Ic O In I9S2. 1951 4 The lacsmu asid Kashmir Collection of Stalls Iks Act, 1960 5 The Kerala Industrial Establishments (National and Festival Holidays) Act, 1953 6 The Madras Compulsory Labour Act, 1953 7 The Madras Industrial Establishments (National and Festival Holidays) Act, 1953 Amended in 1964 8 The Madras Bcedi Industrial Premises (Regula- tions and Conditions of Work) Act, 1953 9 The Orissa Compulsory Labour Act, 1943 10 The Kerala Cigar and Bcedt Industrial Premises (Regu Uuons and Conditions of Work) Act, 1961 11 The Pondicheriy Industrial Establishments (National and Festival Hoi days) Act, 1964 Amended in 1971 12 The Punjab Industrial Establishments (National and Festival Holidays and Casual and Sick Uave) Act, 1965 13 The U P Industrial Establishments (National Hobdays) Act, 1961 14 The Uttar Pradesh Industrial Undertakings (Special ITovisjons for Prevcotion of Uaemploy meni) Act, 1966 15 Bombay Lifts Act.

Fund Act, 4 The Coat Mines (Conservation and Safety) Act. 5 The Biwba) Monej Le-sf-rs* Act, 194-; Amc M* ed n 194' « The C P a-d Ticrir Adj,i-mc-l and Lieuida- Uon of Ind-stnil Worte-s Debt Act. The Agncultunsti Loan (Coorg Amendment) Act, 1936 9 The Coorg Debt Conn La Uon Ad.

1959 SOCIAL SECURITY Central J The Workmen $ Compensation Act. 1930 15 The Punjab Relief of Indebtedness Act, 1934 16 The Punjab Debtors' Protection Act, 1936 17 The Punjab Regulation of Money Lenders' Act, 1936 18 The Saurashtra Agncultural Debtors’ Rehtf Art, 1954 MISCELLANEOUS Central 1 The Cotton Industry (Statistics) Act, 1926 Amended in 1950 2.

date acre d upon by the partes anf if no dvtc IS acrci-d upon from the date on which it is sicn ed by the parties The scillcment rvi ains bind ing for the p;acrccd upoi by the parties or if no such period is agreed upon for a period of SIX months from the date on which the memo- randum of scltlem nt is durine the pcniieni.v of conciliation prixccdincs before a Conciliation Officer and seven davs after the conclusion of such proceedings All strikes and lockouts whether in public uiilitv services or not.

arc deemed to be l Uegnl if com mene^ or declared during the pendenev of (a) conciliation proceedings before a Doard and seven daurt Tribunal or Nuioml Trihuml and two nutnths after the conclusion of such proccedins-s anti (cl durinc an} pcrnxl in which a seltlcmenl or award is in operation in respect of an} of the matters covered b} the set Uement or award Continuance of a strike or lock-out } sitch s stnkc or lock-out was not m contravention of the provi5t0'’\ of the Act when u comm*n, d o» Its continuance was not prohibited b} the Oov emment concerned A strike or a lock-oul dc dared as a eonsccjuence of an illegal lock out or strike is a Uo not deemed to be illegal I man- cial m direct furiheranc'c of an illegal strike or lock out is prohibited under the Act (Iv) l Ji}-«ft and Retrenchment Compensation Workers cmplo}cd in any factor}, mine or plantation having an avenge dailv emp!

o}ment ot 50 or more workers and where the wenk done is not of intermittent or seasonal character, arc entitled to compensation for la} off provided the} have a qualif}ing scnicc of 190 da}s in the case of a workman cmploved below ground m a mine and 240 davs in the case of other cate- gory of workers in the preceding twelve caleniur months Badh or casual workers are, however, not entitled to such compensation The com- pensation 1 $ p.avable for all the davs of lav off whether continuous or intermittent to an em- ployee who has completed one year of continu- ous service, at the rate of fiftv per cent of the total of the basic wages and dearness allowance that would have been payable to him had he not been so laid off However no coropensa tion IS pavable for more than 45 days if there u an agreement to that effect between the work man and employer After the cxpirv of 45 davs the employer mav retrench the worker at any lime giving one months notice m wmme indi- catms the reasons for retrenchment and s*t off the lay-off compensation against the retrench- ment compensation payable to him A laid off workman is not entitled to compen- sation (a) if he refuses to accept anv alter- native employment in the same establishment or m any other establishment belonging to Ih- same owaicr situated in the same town or vilbcc Within a radius of 5 miles from the establish- ment to which he belongs, if m the opinion of the employer, such alternative emp Ioy Tjicnl does j JTis A- I?

nrlkab Viobat Hlhe Satcsof^Vfahirashf^ not call for any special skill or previous experi- ence and enn be done by the workman, provid- ed the wages, which would normally have been paid to Ih'c workman are offered for the alter- native employment a Ko (b) if he does not pre- sent himself for work at the establishment at the jppmnted time during normal working hours at least once a day.

1959 SOCIAL SECURITY Central J The Workmen $ Compensation Act. 1930 15 The Punjab Relief of Indebtedness Act, 1934 16 The Punjab Debtors' Protection Act, 1936 17 The Punjab Regulation of Money Lenders' Act, 1936 18 The Saurashtra Agncultural Debtors’ Rehtf Art, 1954 MISCELLANEOUS Central 1 The Cotton Industry (Statistics) Act, 1926 Amended in 1950 2.

date acre d upon by the partes anf if no dvtc IS acrci-d upon from the date on which it is sicn ed by the parties The scillcment rvi ains bind ing for the p;acrccd upoi by the parties or if no such period is agreed upon for a period of SIX months from the date on which the memo- randum of scltlem nt is durine the pcniieni.v of conciliation prixccdincs before a Conciliation Officer and seven davs after the conclusion of such proceedings All strikes and lockouts whether in public uiilitv services or not.

arc deemed to be l Uegnl if com mene^ or declared during the pendenev of (a) conciliation proceedings before a Doard and seven daurt Tribunal or Nuioml Trihuml and two nutnths after the conclusion of such proccedins-s anti (cl durinc an} pcrnxl in which a seltlcmenl or award is in operation in respect of an} of the matters covered b} the set Uement or award Continuance of a strike or lock-out } sitch s stnkc or lock-out was not m contravention of the provi5t0'’\ of the Act when u comm*n, d o» Its continuance was not prohibited b} the Oov emment concerned A strike or a lock-oul dc dared as a eonsccjuence of an illegal lock out or strike is a Uo not deemed to be illegal I man- cial m direct furiheranc'c of an illegal strike or lock out is prohibited under the Act (Iv) l Ji}-«ft and Retrenchment Compensation Workers cmplo}cd in any factor}, mine or plantation having an avenge dailv emp!

o}ment ot 50 or more workers and where the wenk done is not of intermittent or seasonal character, arc entitled to compensation for la} off provided the} have a qualif}ing scnicc of 190 da}s in the case of a workman cmploved below ground m a mine and 240 davs in the case of other cate- gory of workers in the preceding twelve caleniur months Badh or casual workers are, however, not entitled to such compensation The com- pensation 1 $ p.avable for all the davs of lav off whether continuous or intermittent to an em- ployee who has completed one year of continu- ous service, at the rate of fiftv per cent of the total of the basic wages and dearness allowance that would have been payable to him had he not been so laid off However no coropensa tion IS pavable for more than 45 days if there u an agreement to that effect between the work man and employer After the cxpirv of 45 davs the employer mav retrench the worker at any lime giving one months notice m wmme indi- catms the reasons for retrenchment and s*t off the lay-off compensation against the retrench- ment compensation payable to him A laid off workman is not entitled to compen- sation (a) if he refuses to accept anv alter- native employment in the same establishment or m any other establishment belonging to Ih- same owaicr situated in the same town or vilbcc Within a radius of 5 miles from the establish- ment to which he belongs, if m the opinion of the employer, such alternative emp Ioy Tjicnl does j JTis A- I?

nrlkab Viobat Hlhe Satcsof^Vfahirashf^ not call for any special skill or previous experi- ence and enn be done by the workman, provid- ed the wages, which would normally have been paid to Ih'c workman are offered for the alter- native employment a Ko (b) if he does not pre- sent himself for work at the establishment at the jppmnted time during normal working hours at least once a day.

matters relatirs: to illecal strkes and lcs.k- outs, l*sal aid to repre-.entati\-e a'-pnted onions 31 Gotemmert etpenses m important prouecdin''s rroieclion to be given to emp’o^ees m cedain tasts and pcnaliiei.- for contravening tn; pro- visions of th; Act Since 1960 the Act has bc;n amend'd from time to tim* An Am Tdins Act was passed m 1^6^ empowenne Industnal and Labour Courts, to d»l cffcctiv-lv with the casts of contempt committed before them 11 MISCELL-WEOUS fa) THE CHILDREN (PLEDGING OF Lk BOLTl) ACT 19'ou"5 chi’dren bt t*'eir parents to emplovtrs m lieu of loans or advanc's The Act app’is to th; whole of India ft d*vfarcs void an acreement, wntt*n c* oral, to p’ede; the labour of a child below 1 ^ vears bv the child s parent or guardian n return for an Shop keepers 6 7 IS 21 Cm) Ntoney lenders • 3S 47 75 80 (iv) Co operauve Soeities 1 2 12 1* (v) Others 35 61 9lt3 91 (b) Perpose of Borromos (i) Production • ' 16 26 29 30 (ii) Gonsiinptio B 78 6i 130 130 (ill) Social • 17 33 59 62 (Iv) Others 15 25* 29 NOTS — ® Ii include* RS 1 for which source w. an increase of about 77 per cent Money lenders continued to be the mam source of borrowing About 53 f«r cent cf the aierage amount of debt was lor the purpose of consumption expenditure The incidence cf indebtedness was slightly less among other labour households ’han among agri- cultural lat Kaur households, but the amount of aieragc debt was higher among the formci Wniaic of Agncultnnl t*bor»tro (i) Emplosmcnt The basic maladv from which agricultural labourers suffer is the lack of adequate m,i Joy ment opportunitrs particul^rl) dunne the slack season resulting in wide spread under-cinplw- ment and consequently low Ici'c! to the extent possible- the following special Central programmes aim- ed at the creation of additional employment op- portunities for the weaker section of the rural ' society were in progress during 1972-73. 1972--74 As an outlay of Rs 100 crom schemes, with an estimated cost of over Rs 110 Al RICULt UBAt LAtl Ol K 2S1 crores ha\c already been cleared Of ih"« minor irrifianon schemes account for 54 per cent roads 25 per cent, soil conservation 8 per cent, aflorcstaiion 7 per cent, and otlim 6 ptr cent Since the inception of the programme, an tapendilurc of Rs 52 crores has bc-n incurnd till December 1972 Till S.