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22-Mar-2020 16:13

Although I have it installed for some time now, I've been avoiding using Visual Studio . The incremental improvements in the compiler simply aren't worth putting up with the braindead, butt-slow IDE.

Thus, I've been continuing to use Visual C 6.0 SP5 PP.

Applying this both horizontally and vertically gives the bicubic filter.

The fact that you calculate the 2D filter as two 1D passes means that the 2D filter is separable; this reduces the number of effective taps for the 2D filter from 16 to 8.

That is a valid question, given that I don't really like Direct3D (which I affectionately call "caps bit hell").

The reason is that I wrote a basic Open GL display driver for 1.5.5 and found that it was unusable due to a bug in the NVIDIA drivers that caused a stall of up to ten seconds when switching between display contexts.

Coming back from the Peninsula there is a sign that says: "Emergency parking: 1/4 mile." Several people suggested disable the frame pointer omission (FPO) optimization and prevent inlining, but it also doesn't stop the compiler from using spill space if it needs to — which means you basically have to set up a stack frame anyway.

Now for the real kicker: those extraneous moves hurt on a Pentium 4, because on a P4, a register-to-register MMX/SSE/SSE2 move has a latency of 6 clocks.NET Framework, which currently doesn't work under WOW32. VC6, with the pre-release VC8 compiler from the Windows Server 2003 DDK.This is a bit clumsy since the VC6 debugger doesn't understand VC7 debug info, and certainly can't debug a 64-bit app, so I have to use the beta AMD64 Win Dbg instead, but at least I have the AMD64 build in the same project file as the 32-bit build.If you have extra shifter or ALU bandwidth you can attack this by replacing , but you can't do this when the compiler is generating code from intrinsics.And before you say that performance doesn't matter so much, remember that the purpose of those intrinsics is so that you can optimize hotspots using CPU-specific optimizations. This all only pertains to the Microsoft Visual C compiler, and as it turns out, the Intel C/C Compiler generates much better MMX and SSE2 code. As it stands right now, though, I still have to use Visual C , and that means I'm still going to have to hand-roll a lot of assembly code for performance.

Now for the real kicker: those extraneous moves hurt on a Pentium 4, because on a P4, a register-to-register MMX/SSE/SSE2 move has a latency of 6 clocks.

NET Framework, which currently doesn't work under WOW32. VC6, with the pre-release VC8 compiler from the Windows Server 2003 DDK.

This is a bit clumsy since the VC6 debugger doesn't understand VC7 debug info, and certainly can't debug a 64-bit app, so I have to use the beta AMD64 Win Dbg instead, but at least I have the AMD64 build in the same project file as the 32-bit build.

If you have extra shifter or ALU bandwidth you can attack this by replacing , but you can't do this when the compiler is generating code from intrinsics.

And before you say that performance doesn't matter so much, remember that the purpose of those intrinsics is so that you can optimize hotspots using CPU-specific optimizations. This all only pertains to the Microsoft Visual C compiler, and as it turns out, the Intel C/C Compiler generates much better MMX and SSE2 code. As it stands right now, though, I still have to use Visual C , and that means I'm still going to have to hand-roll a lot of assembly code for performance.

Well, after installing XP64, I was vindicated — none of the VS.