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24-Sep-2020 22:27

Signs that show the numbers "1337" are popular motifs for pictures and shared widely across the Internet.

One of the hallmarks of leet is its unique approach to orthography, using substitutions of other characters, letters or otherwise, to represent a letter or letters in a word.

Leet, like hacker slang, employs analogy in construction of new words.

For example, if haxored is the past tense of the verb "to hack" (hack → haxor → haxored), then winzored would be easily understood to be the past tense conjugation of "to win," even if the reader had not seen that particular word before.

" (shit) are frequently seen to make a word appear censored to the untrained eye but obvious to a person familiar with leet.

Leet symbols, especially the number 1337, are Internet memes that have spilled over into popular culture.

More obscure forms of leet, involving the use of symbol combinations and almost no letters or numbers, continue to be used for its original purpose of encrypted communication. Variants of leet have been used for censorship purposes for many years; for instance "@$$" (ass) and "$#!

The Cult of the Dead Cow hacker collective has been credited with the original coining of the term, in their text-files of that era.

One theory is that it was developed to defeat text filters created by BBS or Internet Relay Chat system operators for message boards to discourage the discussion of forbidden topics, like cracking and hacking.

Creative misspellings and ASCII-art-derived words were also a way to attempt to indicate one was knowledgeable about the culture of computer users.

Once the reserve of hackers, crackers, and script kiddies, leet has since entered the mainstream.

More obscure forms of leet, involving the use of symbol combinations and almost no letters or numbers, continue to be used for its original purpose of encrypted communication. Variants of leet have been used for censorship purposes for many years; for instance "@$$" (ass) and "$#!The Cult of the Dead Cow hacker collective has been credited with the original coining of the term, in their text-files of that era.One theory is that it was developed to defeat text filters created by BBS or Internet Relay Chat system operators for message boards to discourage the discussion of forbidden topics, like cracking and hacking.Creative misspellings and ASCII-art-derived words were also a way to attempt to indicate one was knowledgeable about the culture of computer users.Once the reserve of hackers, crackers, and script kiddies, leet has since entered the mainstream.However, this practice is not extensively used in regular leet; more often it is seen in situations where the argot (i.e., secret language) characteristics of the system are required, either to exclude newbies or outsiders in general, i.e., anything that the average reader cannot make sense of is valid; a valid reader should himself try to make sense, if deserving of the underlying message.