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10-Sep-2020 18:53

A lot of Canadian entrepreneurs, however, more closely resemble sloths.

It’s hard to blame them, though, because plodding along slowly has worked beautifully up to this point.

Yet the sloth-like behaviour continues.“The first, and arguably most significant, obstacle to growth is the apparent dearth of business owners with an appetite for strong development in the first place,” according to a 2013 report by the Centre for Digital Entrepreneurship and Economic Performance (DEEP), a think tank in Waterloo.

Even in the early, rose-coloured-glasses phase of launching a start-up, few Canadians are dreaming big.

The government promotes entrepreneurship via a tantalizing smorgasbord of federal and provincial grants, loans and tax incentives for start-ups — one of the richest sets of subsi­dies in the OECD.

A new entrepreneur with a decent accountant can write down a lot of business costs and write some off alto­gether, while paying a very low tax rate overall. Canada is now the second-easiest place in the world to start a company, reports the World Bank, meaning that we trail New Zealand.

And Canada’s lousy record on innovation isn’t improving.

That’s because most Canadian start-ups never amount to much.

More than three-quarters employ ten or fewer people, and more than half are micro-enterprises, with no more than four employees.The sun came out just in time for a quick chance to see more of this beautiful part of Dublin on foot... pic.twitter.com/q QFo Mxb Jac — Justin Trudeau (@Justin Trudeau) July 4, 2017 After today's Dail business joined @Justin Trudeau for quick jog through #Phoenix Park.Now off to Dublin Castle for evening business pic.twitter.com/irb1nnmj9I — Leo Varadkar (@campaignforleo) July 4, 2017 Mr Trudeau is famed for his sock choice and often wears a special pair for particular occasions, with many dubbing it “sock diplomacy”.The two leaders share clear parallels in the sense that they are both young, progressive and occupy the centre ground.They are also in similarly challenging positions given they both face testing times with their heavyweight neighbours – the US under Donald Trump and Britain’s decision to leave the EU.

More than three-quarters employ ten or fewer people, and more than half are micro-enterprises, with no more than four employees.

The sun came out just in time for a quick chance to see more of this beautiful part of Dublin on foot... pic.twitter.com/q QFo Mxb Jac — Justin Trudeau (@Justin Trudeau) July 4, 2017 After today's Dail business joined @Justin Trudeau for quick jog through #Phoenix Park.

Now off to Dublin Castle for evening business pic.twitter.com/irb1nnmj9I — Leo Varadkar (@campaignforleo) July 4, 2017 Mr Trudeau is famed for his sock choice and often wears a special pair for particular occasions, with many dubbing it “sock diplomacy”.

The two leaders share clear parallels in the sense that they are both young, progressive and occupy the centre ground.

They are also in similarly challenging positions given they both face testing times with their heavyweight neighbours – the US under Donald Trump and Britain’s decision to leave the EU.

Small businesses are hardly irrelevant; they contribute roughly 30 per cent of each province’s GDP, and employ 70 per cent of Canadians who work in the private sector.