Mint not updating us bank

13-Feb-2021 05:27

Each update included small tweaks and improvements, there were a few color scheme changes, but everything was largely consistent and familiar.

Less than one year later, Ubuntu releases looked like this: Ubuntu opted for a radically different user interface, called Unity, that was buggy as hell (it’s much more stable now).

You can’t pop into any computer repair shop with your Debian rig and get help.

The only help you’re going to get is through Linux forums, IRC channels, mailing lists, and occasionally fantastic Linux blogs such as . I fix my own computers, and vastly prefer talking via typed messages over the Internet, than in person or over the telephone. But for many, this is horrible and a valid reason to avoid Linux.

This isn’t a purely Ubuntu problem, and it isn’t restricted to user interfaces.

Linux distributions often make radical changes that break or change things you used to do with your computer. This is one of the few entries in the list that is getting worse, not better.

If you are unable, or unwilling, to learn and work through Linux’s complexities, you may want to avoid Linux. It’s difficult to pinpoint this exactly, but relatively speaking, it is safe to say not many.

Problems you encounter are your responsibility to fix.

What purpose and audience does Cinnamon have that Gnome Shell can’t fulfill?

There are now a handful of distributions that work straight out of the box for most people, and setting them up is only slightly more difficult than a recent copy of Windows.

But even with those improvements, new users must, at least, sift through all the available distributions to find the easy ones, learn how to download the right install image, learn to burn the image to a disc or create a bootable USB thumb drive, get to the install portion, and decipher what each prompt is asking.

These developers worked as a cohesive, managed unit all working towards the same goal, and produced a great product in a short period. There are never enough talented developers working together on enough of the operating system.

Linux, on the other hand, is a mixture of code, some of it 20 years old, from millions of developers of varying talent, working on whatever the hell they feel like. That a powerful and functional operating system is the result of this chaos is fantastic and awe-inspiring. And when something does gain significant progress and momentum, it often fragments into multiple projects all doing exactly the same thing (see reason #4) because there is no unifying vision or management.

What purpose and audience does Cinnamon have that Gnome Shell can’t fulfill?

There are now a handful of distributions that work straight out of the box for most people, and setting them up is only slightly more difficult than a recent copy of Windows.

But even with those improvements, new users must, at least, sift through all the available distributions to find the easy ones, learn how to download the right install image, learn to burn the image to a disc or create a bootable USB thumb drive, get to the install portion, and decipher what each prompt is asking.

These developers worked as a cohesive, managed unit all working towards the same goal, and produced a great product in a short period. There are never enough talented developers working together on enough of the operating system.

Linux, on the other hand, is a mixture of code, some of it 20 years old, from millions of developers of varying talent, working on whatever the hell they feel like. That a powerful and functional operating system is the result of this chaos is fantastic and awe-inspiring. And when something does gain significant progress and momentum, it often fragments into multiple projects all doing exactly the same thing (see reason #4) because there is no unifying vision or management.

All these pointless competing products make it difficult for Linux promoters to make clear recommendations, and make it difficult for newcomers to figure out what the hell is going on. The current version of Ubuntu runs slower on my powerful gaming desktop than 8.04 (Hardy Heron) did on my then old Pentium 4 laptop.