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25-Mar-2020 02:28

“One of the things that we’re undoubtedly seeing is a rise in the use of social networking sites as a channel through which sexual predators can prey on children online,” he said. “The Alhamadi case is a really good illustration of that, where we had a number of victims surfacing in the UK and these offenders who had caused very significant harm to these victims had never been in the same country as them, let alone been close to them.“But through hacking into their social networking sites, and effectively blackmailing them, they had actually induced them to carry out acts on webcam and in doing so caused some people physical and immense psychological harm.” From their base in Kuwait, the Alhamadi brothers targeted a total of 110 children in the UK, Australia, Canada, Cyprus, Denmark, Iceland, Ireland, Jersey, Netherlands, New Zealand, Portugal, Sweden and the USA, CEOP said.Indonesian President Joko Widodo has defended tough new penalties such as chemical castration and the death penalty for tackling sex crimes.He said there would be "no compromise" for child sex offenders.Read: ECPAT report indicates growth of child-sex tourism "The new laws will prohibit registered child-sex offenders from leaving Australia or holding Australian passports," said Foreign Minister Julie Bishop, adding that she would cancel the passports of some 20,000 pedophiles on the national child-sex offender register.She noted that almost 800 such offenders had traveled overseas from Australia last year, with many of them failing to notify police of their travel intentions despite having high risks of reoffending.

“But it’s possible for a parent who perhaps doesn’t know much about the internet still to have a sensible conversation with their kid about how to stay safe and certainly make sure that they’re doing what they can to exercise control over the way the device can be used and also make sure their kids are aware of the risks.” Mr Davies also warned offenders there was “no hiding place”, adding: “There’s nobody out there who is too technically proficient to escape detection.Mohammed Khalaf Al Ali Alhamadi, 35, and his brother Yousef, 27, tricked 78 children aged 12 to 16 in the UK to give them their online passwords before threatening them into carrying out inappropriate sex acts via a webcam.Mr Davies said paedophiles were increasingly using the internet to abuse children online from overseas.The brand was one of some 800 companies allowed to use the royal coat of arms.The bill passed with a comfortable majority though representatives from both parties voted against it.

“But it’s possible for a parent who perhaps doesn’t know much about the internet still to have a sensible conversation with their kid about how to stay safe and certainly make sure that they’re doing what they can to exercise control over the way the device can be used and also make sure their kids are aware of the risks.” Mr Davies also warned offenders there was “no hiding place”, adding: “There’s nobody out there who is too technically proficient to escape detection.

Mohammed Khalaf Al Ali Alhamadi, 35, and his brother Yousef, 27, tricked 78 children aged 12 to 16 in the UK to give them their online passwords before threatening them into carrying out inappropriate sex acts via a webcam.

Mr Davies said paedophiles were increasingly using the internet to abuse children online from overseas.

The brand was one of some 800 companies allowed to use the royal coat of arms.

The bill passed with a comfortable majority though representatives from both parties voted against it.

() Australia plans to introduce what its justice minister has termed "the strongest crackdown on child-sex tourism ever" by banning convicted pedophiles from traveling overseas, the government announced on Tuesday.